Leyland Trucks: UK built hybrid donated to the B.C.V.M

Leyland Trucks are the UK's only remaining builder of light to heavy commercial vehicles. They sell under the DAF brand with the LF (above) being designed, engineered and built in Lancashire.
Leyland Trucks are the UK’s only remaining builder of light to heavy commercial vehicles. They sell under the DAF brand with the LF (above) being designed, engineered and built in Lancashire.

Leyland Trucks Ltd:

A diesel-electric hybrid truck has been donated by Leyland Trucks to the British Commercial Vehicle Museum following its use by the company as part of an extensive development programme of this advanced technology. The vehicle was handed over by Ron Augustyn, Managing Director of Leyland Trucks, to John Gilchrist, Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the museum, which is located in the centre of the Lancashire town of Leyland.

Speaking at the handover Ron Augustyn said: “We are very pleased to be able to continue our on-going support of the British Commercial Vehicle Museum by donating this Leyland built hybrid truck. “This diesel-electric hybrid truck is based on our highly successful LF model which is Britain’s best-selling truck. Its presence as a centrepiece of the museum will demonstrate to visitors – and in particular to the many young people who come on school trips – just how active Leyland Trucks is in the development of trucks that are more fuel efficient and more environmentally acceptable. We look forward to the display.”

John Gilchrist commented: “The British Commercial Vehicle Museum is the UK’s premiere centre covering the history of road transport but what we do here isn’t just about the past. This is a living museum in which we also put on show products and technologies that are in use today along with those of the future.“I am delighted therefore to receive this generous donation from Leyland Trucks of a development vehicle that uses a new technology which although in its infancy shows great promise and in the development of which Leyland Trucks has been very much to the fore. Putting this vehicle on display will allow us to give the thousands of visitors who come to the museum each year a glimpse into one potential future technology. And it extends the scope of the superb attractions that we can offer visitors from the earliest days of steam vehicles over a century ago to the present day. This makes the British Commercial Vehicle Museum unique in the way that it comprehensively chronicles the history and development of an industry that is so central to all our lives.”

The hybrid truck is based on a standard 7.5 tonne DAF LF model and uses a 4.5 litre diesel engine in conjunction with an electric motor/generator, which operates in various modes to maximise fuel economy savings. The vehicle harvests energy usually wasted during braking events to charge the hybrid batteries. During operation the vehicle automatically switches from pure diesel drive to electric drive, which is both silent and cleaner. A six-speed automated transmission is fitted along with a 44 kW electric engine/generator and 96 Lithium Ion battery cells, each giving an output of 3.4 volts.

Located on King Street in the centre of Leyland, the British Commercial Vehicle Museum offers a fascinating and enjoyable day out for people of all ages. As well as an unequalled range of permanent exhibits it stages numerous specialist events and gatherings throughout the year, welcomes educational and group visits and is available for private events.

The British Commercial Vehicle Museum is easily accessed by road from Junction 28 of the M6, from where it is clearly signed, and is well served by public transport, both bus and rail.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s